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How to Choose the Right Broken Arrow Veterinarian For Your Pet

Categories: Featured, Vet Tips

If you now own a pet or are contemplating getting a pet, your first consideration, even before you get your pet, is finding a Broken Arrow veterinarian or Broken Arrow veterinary hospital where your pet can receive the necessary health care. A veterinarian in General Veterinary Practice is much like your Primary Care Physician or Pediatrician. They provide your pet with the general and routine services to keep your pet healthy. Like human medicine, veterinary medicine has become quite technical and sophisticated with a multiplicity of “Specialists” that your general practitioner may need to refer your pet for special help.

Unlike human medicine with only the human species to consider, veterinary medicine has many different species and hundreds of sub-species of animals, birds, fish and reptiles to consider. Each group has its own special needs. Since it is impossible for any one person to become proficient in all of these different disciplines, we have divided Veterinary Medicine into two major groups; Large Animal Veterinary Practice and Small Animal Veterinary Practice.

General Veterinary Practice Large Animal: This type of practice would typically care for farm animals like horses, cattle, sheep, goats, Hogs, etc. However many specialties exist in the large animal category such as: Equine (horses only), Dairy Practice, Beef Cattle, Sheep and Goats, Hogs, etc. There are many others that would come under the heading of Large Animal Specialty Practice but I think you get the idea.

General Practice Small Animal: Here we have a veterinary facility that cares for Dogs, Cats, Rats and Rodents, Birds, Reptiles, Fish etc. Dogs and Cats will be the bulk of this type of veterinary facility, and other types of pets will likely be referred to a specialist. Cats Only Clinics are becoming very popular and there are many advantages to this type of veterinary practice. Bird or Avian Specialists are in larger cities or in some larger facilities with several Veterinarians; one may specialize in some of the more exotic species. You may find a veterinarian who is considered a specialist to certain breeds of dogs like English Bulldogs that have special hereditary and developmental problems and do best when treated by someone that is very familiar with their special needs.

Now consider the fact that Veterinary Medicine has almost as many Board Certified Specialists as found in the Human Medical Field. Some of the more common referral specialties are:

Veterinary Dentistry; Have advanced training and equipment to perform all sorts of dental procedures and oral surgery.

Veterinary Surgical Practice: Special training and equipment to perform almost any type of surgical procedure.

Veterinary Dermatology: Handel many difficult skin and coat conditions and extensive allergy testing.

Veterinary Gynecology: Handel reproduction and delivery problems

Veterinary Radiology: Have the equipment and training to provide advanced radiation therapy, take and evaluate X-Rays, CATSCAN etc.

Veterinary Ophthalmology: A competent eye specialist is very important and these practitioners have the equipment and training to do the job.

There are many more specialties in veterinary medicine, but these are the ones most likely to be used in private veterinary practice. All of these disciplines are utilized by both Large Animal Practices and Small Animal Practices.

You can see that choosing a Veterinarian can be a major experience in some cases. You will have no trouble if you take your time and evaluate the options that are available to you. Most veterinarians are dedicated to doing the very best job they can and try to provide a happy, healthy pet for you. To help you find the right Veterinarian for you and your pet, ask yourself the following questions

QUESTIONS YOU NEED TO ASK:

1. Does the veterinarian or veterinary facility have the personnel to care for my pet?
Ans. Not just for vaccinations but medical and surgical needs.
2. Is the facility reasonably close to where I live?
Ans. For routine health care and emergencies find a veterinarian within 15-25 miles. If you need to drive a long distance you may put off a needed visit.
3. Do I need an appointment to receive services?
Ans. In order to provide you with a more efficient session most veterinarians try to work by appointments, but few will turn you down if you have an urgent need, or recommend a collogue if they just can’t get to your pet at the time.
4. Does the veterinarian provide 24/7 emergency care?
Ans. In most metropolitan areas there is an Emergency Clinic available and staffed with personnel that are highly trained in all kinds of emergencies. In smaller communities and rural areas you may need to travel to another facility or your local veterinarian will handle the emergency.
5. What have I heard about this facility from friends and relatives?
Ans. If they are complaining about treatment or services, use caution. Complaints about prices are frequently lack of understanding or poor communication.
6. Are the personnel; receptionist, nurses, kennel attendant and the Drs friendly and kind to my pet?
Ans. A happy pet is a well pet. You want your pet to not be afraid to enter the veterinarians clinic or hospital.
7. Does the Dr. freely answer my questions or is he/she aloof and too busy to be bothered?
Ans. If you are going to do the best for your pet, you must have good communication with the doctor.
8. Would I feel good about recommending this veterinary facility to my friends and relatives?
Ans. Think about this. Would you want someone recommended to you that didn’t meet your standards?
9. Is the facility neat, clean and well organized?
Ans. The feeling you get and the general appearance of the personnel and facility says a whole lot about their efficiency and pride in their work.

10. Do I feel comfortable and assured that everyone at this facility . will provide the best of care for my pet?

Ans. If you are not comfortable with your Veterinarian and his/her staff, you will be reluctant to follow their recommendations. You do not need to be best of friends with your veterinarian, but you do need to have total confidence in his ability.

A positive conclusion to the above questions will surely produce a Broken Arrow veterinary doctor and staff that will bring good results for your pet for many years to come. Let me conclude that by saying the vast majority of veterinarians are very concerned about the animals they are taking care of and try very hard to please their clients. GOOD LUCK with a happy, healthy pet. Here at Broken Arrow’s Village Vet Animal Clinic, we treat not only dogs and cats, but we specialize in exotic pets as well.

Village Vet Animal Clinic

2026 West Houston St, Broken Arrow, OK 74012

918-258-0040

choosing a veterinarian

© Eric Isselée - Fotolia.com

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