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Got a New Pet? Pet-Proof Your Home

Categories: cats, Dogs, Featured, pet safety

pet-proof your home Broken Arrow OKA new pet is more than how cute it looks like; it’s also another life that you need to be responsible of. These pets of yours get into trouble anytime, and — contrary to popular opinion — pets don’t always rationally know what can be potentially harmful to eat or drink. A pet’s safety is always crucial, but you’ll also want to take precautionary measures to safeguard your furniture, carpeting, and other belongings (as well as your favorite pair of shoes). Read on for tips that will help you pet-proof your home.

Pet Safety: Gates and Latches

“The most common injury in new pets that I see in my practice is puppies falling off beds, sofas, and other high furniture,” says Ernest Ward, Jr., D.V.M., the founder and chief of staff at Seaside Animal Care in Calabash, North Carolina, and a regular guest on The Rachael Ray Show. To prevent such falls, keep your pet off high furniture — a rule that holds for kittens too, says Ward.

It’s also important to restrict a new pet’s access to your home by shutting off rooms with a closed door or child gates. “This not only prevents accidental injury but also can help curtail house-soiling problems,” says Ward. Establishing boundaries for your puppy or kitten early on leads to a well-trained adult animal.

Household Cleaners, Chemicals, and Plants

While your pet is still getting accustomed to its new home, install childproof latches on cabinet doors and keep household chemicals and cleaners — such as bleach, ammonia, and antifreeze — well sealed and out of your pet’s reach.

For dogs, the most dangerous common toxin is antifreeze, says Dr. Louise Murray, D.V.M., director of medicine at the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York City and author of Vet Confidential: An Insider’s Guide to Protecting Your Pet’s Health. “A dog may lick it off the floor while its owner is working on a car,” she says.

For cats, the most dangerous toxin is the lily, which can cause fatal kidney failure if even a leaf is nibbled. Other common houseplants are also toxic to dogs and cats; ask your veterinarian for a list.

 

Read full article at everydayhealth.com

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